Nancy, Agricultural Coop Manager
Nancy, Agricultural Coop Manager

“It’s still a challenge for a woman in a male dominated business. I hope by the time my granddaughter’s are in the work force, these challenges are in the past.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Farmers, Ranchers, and Other Agricultural Managers: 23.8%

 

Victoria, Senior Electrical Engineer & Team Lead
Victoria, Senior Electrical Engineer & Team Lead

“Working in a field that lacks significant female representation has its list of challenges. One challenge is the feeling of constantly having to prove one is capable of doing the job just as well or better than her male counterparts.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Architectural and engineering managers : 7.6% 

  Christa, Piano Technician   Women as a percentage of total employed as Architectural and engineering managers : 10-15% (Estimated) 

Christa, Piano Technician

Women as a percentage of total employed as Architectural and engineering managers : 10-15% (Estimated) 

Allissa, Communications Electrician
Allissa, Communications Electrician

Women as a percentage of total employed as Electrician: 2.4%

Danell, City Letter Carrier
Danell, City Letter Carrier

Women as a percentage of total employed as mail carriers in 2014: 40.0% (4% in 1972)

"During the course of the 20th century, the number of women serving as mail carriers grew from less than 100 to more than 84,000.  In 2007 there were more than 96,000 women carriers, representing 40 percent of the carrier force." (HISTORIAN, UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE)

Jane, Self Defense Instructor for Women and Teen Girls
Jane, Self Defense Instructor for Women and Teen Girls

"Training in Reality Based Self Defense at times I was the only woman but it made me stronger and I gained respect from the men and I learned so much from them."

Zoey, Design Management and Apprentice Blacksmith
Zoey, Design Management and Apprentice Blacksmith

“Being the only woman blacksmith in a family blacksmith shop is a reality that can be your worst enemy or your best friend. Sometimes both in one day. Honestly it takes more willpower than anything. Push yourself to do as well as they do. To not to let yourself get rubbed the wrong way with the shots they take, because they do it to each other as well.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Welding, soldering, and brazing workers: 4.8%

 

Kathy, Police Detective
Kathy, Police Detective

“The bias towards women in this job has certainly lessened since 1988 when I came on the job. Surely, it has been proven we do this job as well as our male counterparts, and in many ways, even better. My attitude always has been that anyone coming into this field must know they have to "prove" themselves capable of the very challenging demands of this type of work, whether you are male or female, black or white, etc.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Detectives and criminal investigators : 21%

 

Jessie, Master Plumber/Company President
Jessie, Master Plumber/Company President

“I think it's easy for women to dismiss the idea of working in the trades because the reputation might be that it's a ‘man's world.’ This is not the case any longer and there are many opportunities for not only women, but also for the younger generation to enter the trades for a well paying and highly rewarding career. I think we are heavily persuaded in high school that the expectation is that we must go to college. While college is an option, it does not necessarily mean it's the best option for a particular individual. I have done both and continue to pay back student loans, but chose the trades as my final career path because the type of work was more rewarding personally.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as pipelayers, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters: 1.6%

Anna, Machine Operator
Anna, Machine Operator

"What I do for a living isn't ideal for others. For myself, I like a challenge and trying new things. Your constantly showing that you DO belong, that YOU can do this and keep moving forward. I wouldn't be the woman I am today if it wasn't for working in manufacturing. It built up my confidence and strength."

Women as a percentage of total employed as Machinists: 4.5%

Jess, Barber
Jess, Barber

“I’ve wanted to be a barber for as long as I can remember. I picked up my first clipper when I was in grade school. Growing up with three brothers, I quickly developed a passion for the craft and became quite good at it. People often argue that because I am a woman I cannot be a barber. In the past, barbers were typically men but the role is not gender specific. The word barber comes from the Latin term ‘barba’ meaning beard. A barber is a person that cuts the hair/beard of a man. Although there are more male barbers than female, it is becoming more popular for women to take on this profession. Confidence, consistency, and a steady hand have guided me in challenging the ‘women cannot be barbers’ stereotypes.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Barbers: 16.8%

  Shelly, Mastering Engineer/Audio Engineer   "I was drawn to the audio field because for me it is the perfect combination of creativity and practicality. Working in a male dominated field like audio engineering feels empowering and lonely all at once. On one hand I’m ushering in an opportunity to tip the scales in a different direction towards a more inclusive, non-gender biased career. Other times being a woman in this industry feels isolating, especially when there are few female role models to look to in the industry. Whenever I connect with other women working in this same profession I immediately feel closeness with them. We almost always stay in contact long after our first meeting. I think any industry that doesn’t offer equal opportunities for all people is doing itself a disservice and ultimately preventing opportunities for the maximum amount of innovation."  Women as a percentage of total employed as Broadcast and Sound Engineering Technicians: 13%   

Shelly, Mastering Engineer/Audio Engineer

"I was drawn to the audio field because for me it is the perfect combination of creativity and practicality. Working in a male dominated field like audio engineering feels empowering and lonely all at once. On one hand I’m ushering in an opportunity to tip the scales in a different direction towards a more inclusive, non-gender biased career. Other times being a woman in this industry feels isolating, especially when there are few female role models to look to in the industry. Whenever I connect with other women working in this same profession I immediately feel closeness with them. We almost always stay in contact long after our first meeting. I think any industry that doesn’t offer equal opportunities for all people is doing itself a disservice and ultimately preventing opportunities for the maximum amount of innovation."

Women as a percentage of total employed as Broadcast and Sound Engineering Technicians: 13%

 

Amber, Global Variable Cost Productivity Leader
Amber, Global Variable Cost Productivity Leader

“I respect my peers and have been fortunate in my career to be surrounded by great leaders and mentors (both men and women). I’ve grown a bit accustomed to being one of the few women around the table and I actually enjoy it…but I can admit there are times the environment can be intimidating but any environment that is “new” and pulls you out of your “comfort zone” will do that. "

Women as a percentage of total employed in Senior Manager Roles: 23%

 

 

 

Rebecca, Head Chef
Rebecca, Head Chef

“I think the best part of being in a male-dominated profession is when the old farts (sales reps etc) walk in looking for the boss and step around me to speak to one of my male staff. I love creating that bit of discomfort while breaking down barriers, it's a little bit of retribution.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Chefs and Head Cooks: 21.4% 

Kaleen, Tile Design Technician
Kaleen, Tile Design Technician

“I used to be a business management professional, working that 9 to 5 locked in a building 5 days a week. I married a contractor and began helping him with many aspects of construction, but tiling stole my heart. I can let my creativity flow when I work with tile. I see the design come to life as I work. Instant gratification.”


Women as a percentage of total employed as Tile installers and Finishers: 2.3%

 

Nicole, IT Manager
Nicole, IT Manager

“The reality is, as a young lady entering college, an IT career doesn't sound so glamorous. With the growth of STEM in early education and the presence of technology in almost everything we do, I hope to see that change. The standard societal mold of an IT professional needs to be broken to make it more appealing to young women.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Computer and information systems managers: 26.7%

KatSchleicher_ArtistStatement3.jpg
Nancy, Agricultural Coop Manager
Victoria, Senior Electrical Engineer & Team Lead
  Christa, Piano Technician   Women as a percentage of total employed as Architectural and engineering managers : 10-15% (Estimated) 
Allissa, Communications Electrician
Danell, City Letter Carrier
Jane, Self Defense Instructor for Women and Teen Girls
Zoey, Design Management and Apprentice Blacksmith
Kathy, Police Detective
Jessie, Master Plumber/Company President
Anna, Machine Operator
Jess, Barber
  Shelly, Mastering Engineer/Audio Engineer   "I was drawn to the audio field because for me it is the perfect combination of creativity and practicality. Working in a male dominated field like audio engineering feels empowering and lonely all at once. On one hand I’m ushering in an opportunity to tip the scales in a different direction towards a more inclusive, non-gender biased career. Other times being a woman in this industry feels isolating, especially when there are few female role models to look to in the industry. Whenever I connect with other women working in this same profession I immediately feel closeness with them. We almost always stay in contact long after our first meeting. I think any industry that doesn’t offer equal opportunities for all people is doing itself a disservice and ultimately preventing opportunities for the maximum amount of innovation."  Women as a percentage of total employed as Broadcast and Sound Engineering Technicians: 13%   
Amber, Global Variable Cost Productivity Leader
Rebecca, Head Chef
Kaleen, Tile Design Technician
Nicole, IT Manager
KatSchleicher_ArtistStatement3.jpg
Nancy, Agricultural Coop Manager

“It’s still a challenge for a woman in a male dominated business. I hope by the time my granddaughter’s are in the work force, these challenges are in the past.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Farmers, Ranchers, and Other Agricultural Managers: 23.8%

 

Victoria, Senior Electrical Engineer & Team Lead

“Working in a field that lacks significant female representation has its list of challenges. One challenge is the feeling of constantly having to prove one is capable of doing the job just as well or better than her male counterparts.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Architectural and engineering managers : 7.6% 

Christa, Piano Technician

Women as a percentage of total employed as Architectural and engineering managers : 10-15% (Estimated) 

Allissa, Communications Electrician

Women as a percentage of total employed as Electrician: 2.4%

Danell, City Letter Carrier

Women as a percentage of total employed as mail carriers in 2014: 40.0% (4% in 1972)

"During the course of the 20th century, the number of women serving as mail carriers grew from less than 100 to more than 84,000.  In 2007 there were more than 96,000 women carriers, representing 40 percent of the carrier force." (HISTORIAN, UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE)

Jane, Self Defense Instructor for Women and Teen Girls

"Training in Reality Based Self Defense at times I was the only woman but it made me stronger and I gained respect from the men and I learned so much from them."

Zoey, Design Management and Apprentice Blacksmith

“Being the only woman blacksmith in a family blacksmith shop is a reality that can be your worst enemy or your best friend. Sometimes both in one day. Honestly it takes more willpower than anything. Push yourself to do as well as they do. To not to let yourself get rubbed the wrong way with the shots they take, because they do it to each other as well.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Welding, soldering, and brazing workers: 4.8%

 

Kathy, Police Detective

“The bias towards women in this job has certainly lessened since 1988 when I came on the job. Surely, it has been proven we do this job as well as our male counterparts, and in many ways, even better. My attitude always has been that anyone coming into this field must know they have to "prove" themselves capable of the very challenging demands of this type of work, whether you are male or female, black or white, etc.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Detectives and criminal investigators : 21%

 

Jessie, Master Plumber/Company President

“I think it's easy for women to dismiss the idea of working in the trades because the reputation might be that it's a ‘man's world.’ This is not the case any longer and there are many opportunities for not only women, but also for the younger generation to enter the trades for a well paying and highly rewarding career. I think we are heavily persuaded in high school that the expectation is that we must go to college. While college is an option, it does not necessarily mean it's the best option for a particular individual. I have done both and continue to pay back student loans, but chose the trades as my final career path because the type of work was more rewarding personally.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as pipelayers, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters: 1.6%

Anna, Machine Operator

"What I do for a living isn't ideal for others. For myself, I like a challenge and trying new things. Your constantly showing that you DO belong, that YOU can do this and keep moving forward. I wouldn't be the woman I am today if it wasn't for working in manufacturing. It built up my confidence and strength."

Women as a percentage of total employed as Machinists: 4.5%

Jess, Barber

“I’ve wanted to be a barber for as long as I can remember. I picked up my first clipper when I was in grade school. Growing up with three brothers, I quickly developed a passion for the craft and became quite good at it. People often argue that because I am a woman I cannot be a barber. In the past, barbers were typically men but the role is not gender specific. The word barber comes from the Latin term ‘barba’ meaning beard. A barber is a person that cuts the hair/beard of a man. Although there are more male barbers than female, it is becoming more popular for women to take on this profession. Confidence, consistency, and a steady hand have guided me in challenging the ‘women cannot be barbers’ stereotypes.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Barbers: 16.8%

Shelly, Mastering Engineer/Audio Engineer

"I was drawn to the audio field because for me it is the perfect combination of creativity and practicality. Working in a male dominated field like audio engineering feels empowering and lonely all at once. On one hand I’m ushering in an opportunity to tip the scales in a different direction towards a more inclusive, non-gender biased career. Other times being a woman in this industry feels isolating, especially when there are few female role models to look to in the industry. Whenever I connect with other women working in this same profession I immediately feel closeness with them. We almost always stay in contact long after our first meeting. I think any industry that doesn’t offer equal opportunities for all people is doing itself a disservice and ultimately preventing opportunities for the maximum amount of innovation."

Women as a percentage of total employed as Broadcast and Sound Engineering Technicians: 13%

 

Amber, Global Variable Cost Productivity Leader

“I respect my peers and have been fortunate in my career to be surrounded by great leaders and mentors (both men and women). I’ve grown a bit accustomed to being one of the few women around the table and I actually enjoy it…but I can admit there are times the environment can be intimidating but any environment that is “new” and pulls you out of your “comfort zone” will do that. "

Women as a percentage of total employed in Senior Manager Roles: 23%

 

 

 

Rebecca, Head Chef

“I think the best part of being in a male-dominated profession is when the old farts (sales reps etc) walk in looking for the boss and step around me to speak to one of my male staff. I love creating that bit of discomfort while breaking down barriers, it's a little bit of retribution.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Chefs and Head Cooks: 21.4% 

Kaleen, Tile Design Technician

“I used to be a business management professional, working that 9 to 5 locked in a building 5 days a week. I married a contractor and began helping him with many aspects of construction, but tiling stole my heart. I can let my creativity flow when I work with tile. I see the design come to life as I work. Instant gratification.”


Women as a percentage of total employed as Tile installers and Finishers: 2.3%

 

Nicole, IT Manager

“The reality is, as a young lady entering college, an IT career doesn't sound so glamorous. With the growth of STEM in early education and the presence of technology in almost everything we do, I hope to see that change. The standard societal mold of an IT professional needs to be broken to make it more appealing to young women.”

Women as a percentage of total employed as Computer and information systems managers: 26.7%

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